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ice:commands:peaklock

Peak Lock and Current Controller Command Set

List of commands for the ICE Peak Lock Servo. Please see Common Laser Controller Command Set for commands relating to the laser controller.

Phase?

Arguments:

No Arguments Taken

Example:

Phase?  
58

I2C Command Number: 32


Description

Returns the phase shift (in degrees) on the dither signal modulating the laser current.</div>

Phase

Arguments:

[Float] PHASE

Example:

Phase 23  
22.5

I2C Command Number: 33


Description

Sets the phase shift to PHASE (in degrees) on the dither signal modulating the laser current. Returns the output of the command Phase? </div>

DitherA?

Arguments:

No Arguments Taken

Example:

DitherA?  
32

I2C Command Number: 34


Description

Returns the amplitude of the dither on the laser current. Output is integer from 0-255. </div>

DitherA

Arguments:

[Int] AMP

Example:

DitherA 35  
35

I2C Command Number: 35


Description

Sets the amplitude of the current modulation to AMP. AMP is an integer ranging from 0 – 255. Command returns the output of the command DitherA? </div>

Dither?

Arguments:

No Arguments Taken

Example:

Dither?  
On

I2C Command Number: 36


Description

Returns the status of the dither on the laser current (on or off). </div>

Dither

Arguments:

[ASCII] On/Off

Example:

Dither On  
On

I2C Command Number: 37


Description

Enables or disables the dither on the laser current. Valid arguments are On or Off. Returns the output of the command Dither?. </div>

ReadVolt

Arguments:

[Int] CHANNEL

Example:

ReadVolt 4 
4.234

I2C Command Number: 38


Description

Returns the voltage measured on channel CHANNEL (in volts). The channels refer to:

  1. Servo Out
  2. Integrator
  3. DC Error
  4. Error Input
  5. Laser Current (1V = 1A)
  6. +2.5V Ref
  7. -2.5V Re
  8. Ground

</div>

Servo?

Arguments:

No Arguments Taken

Example:

Servo?  
On

I2C Command Number: 39


Description

Returns the status of the laser servo (on or off). </div>

Servo

Arguments:

[ASCII] On/Off

Example:

Servo On  
Off

I2C Command Number: 40


Description

Turns on the laser servo (engages the integrator). Returns the output of the command Servo?. </div>

DCOffst?

Arguments:

No Arguments Taken

Example:

DCOffst?  
-2.345

I2C Command Number: 41


Description

Returns DC offset (in volts) applied to the error signal. </div>

DCOffst

Arguments:

[Float] OFFSET

Example:

DCOffst 2.340  
2.342

I2C Command Number: 42


Description

Sets the DC offset (in volts) applied to the error signal to OFFSET. Returns the output of the command DCOffst?. </div>

Gain?

Arguments:

No Arguments Taken

Example:

Gain?  
25

I2C Command Number: 43


Description

Returns Servo Gain. Range is from 0-28 in steps of 2 dB. 0 is a special gain setting where there is no gain (error signal does not go to integrator). </div>

Gain

Arguments:

[Int] GAIN

Example:

Gain 24  
24

I2C Command Number: 44


Description

Sets the Servo Gain. Range is from 0-28 in steps of 2 dB. 0 is a special gain setting where there is no gain (error signal does not go to integrator). Returns the output of the command GetGain? </div>

OpOffst?

Arguments:

No Arguments Taken

Example:

OpOffst?  
129

I2C Command Number: 45


Description

Returns Integrator Op-Amp’s Offset Voltage adjustment value. Range is 0-255. </div>

OpOffst

Arguments:

[Int] OFFSET

Example:

OpOffst 142  
142

I2C Command Number: 46


Description

Sets the Integrator Op-Amp’s Offset Voltage adjustment value. This should be factory set and typically should be set to 128, but it controls the DC Error Input voltage that the servo locks to (should be 0V) OFFSET is an integer from 0-255. Returns the output of the command OpOffst?. </div>

SvOffst?

Arguments:

No Arguments Taken

Example:

SvOffst?  
2.341

I2C Command Number: 47


Description

Returns Servo Offset voltage (in volts). When the servo is engaged, this voltage is the starting voltage that the servo integrates from. </div>

SvOffst

Arguments:

[Float] OFFSET

Example:

SvOffst -1.232  
-1.23

I2C Command Number: 48


Description

Sets the Servo Offset voltage (in volts) to OUTPUT when the servo is turned off. When the servo is engaged, this voltage is the starting voltage that the servo integrates from. Returns the output of the command SvOffst?. </div>

DataChn?

Arguments:

No Arguments Taken

Example:

DataChn?  
2

I2C Command Number: 49


Description

Read Data Channel Mode. There are 3 modes for the Data Channel:

   Mode 1: Record DC Error
   Mode 2: Record Error Input
   Mode 3: Record DC Error and Error Input
   

Note: In Mode 3, the ramp records two channels of data instead of one, doubling the amount of data stored. </div>

DataChn

Arguments:

[Int] CHN_MODE

Example:

DataChn 3 
3

I2C Command Number: 50


Description

Sets the Data Channel Mode. See DataChn? for more details Returns the output of the command DataChn?. </div>

RampSwp?

Arguments:

No Arguments Taken

Example:

RampSwp?  
5.72

I2C Command Number: 51


Description

Reads the sweep range (in volts) for the ramp. </div>

RampSwp

Arguments:

[Float] VOLTAGE

Example:

RampSwp 2.64 
2.65

I2C Command Number: 52


Description

Writes the sweep range (in volts) for the ramp. Range is from 0V to +10V. Returns the output from the command RampSwp?. The ramp will step from SvOffst - RampSwp/2 to SvOffst + RampSwp/2 by increments determined by RampSwp and RampNum and then return to SvOffst every time a RampRun command is initiated.

Note: RampSwp value is rounded and truncated to match range of the servo offset. </div>

RampNum?

Arguments:

No Arguments Taken

Example:

RampNum?  
100

I2C Command Number: 53


Description

Returns the number of data points to be acquired during the ramp. Number of data points is also the number of steps for the ramp.

Note that the amount of bytes stored by the ramp is 2*RampNum. The amount of bytes stored set how much data needs to be read back via the ReadBlk command.

</div>

RampNum

Arguments:

[Int] NUMBER

Example:

RampNum 100 
100

I2C Command Number: 54


Description

Sets the number of data points to be acquired during the ramp. Number of data points is also the number of steps for the ramp.

</div>

RampRun

Arguments:

No Arguments Taken

Example:

RampRun  
Busy

I2C Command Number: 55


Description

Begins ramping the servo output and taking data according to the values set for RampSwp and SvOffst as described above. The Ramp begins at SvOffst - RampSwp/2 and ends of SvOffst + RampSwp/2. When the ramp is completed, the servo output is returned to its starting value of SvOffst. Data can be retrieved with the ReadBlk command. Board will not respond to any new commands while taking data. Returns status of execution of the ramp, either Busy or Finished. Returns fault if ramp is misconfigured. See RampNum? for details. Returns fail if laser is off. </div>

Poles?

Arguments:

No Arguments Taken

Example:

Poles?  
3 0

I2C Command Number: 56


Description

Returns two columns of data. First column is a number 1-5 representing the integrator pole value. Values are 3 kHz, 10 kHz, 30 kHz, 100 kHz and 300 kHz. 1 is the slowest integrator (3 kHz) and 5 is fastest integrator (300 kHz). The second column is a 0 when the differential pole is off and a 1 when it is on. When differential is on, the pole is ~3 times the integrator pole. So if PI pole is 30 kHz, the differential pole is 100 kHz. </div>

Poles

Arguments:

[Int] INTEGRATOR
[Int] DIFFERENTIAL

Example:

Poles 3 1 
3 1

I2C Command Number: 57


Description

Sets the integrator and differential pole positions. INTEGRATOR is a value from 1-5. DIFFERENTIAL is either on (1) or off (0). See Poles? for more details. </div>

EvtLOff?

Arguments:

No Arguments Taken

Example:

EvtLOff?  
4

I2C Command Number: 58


Description

Reads the event address for turning the laser off. Address range is 0-7 where address 0 is no event. </div>

EvtLOff

Arguments:

[Int] ADDRESS

Example:

EvtLOff 2 
2

I2C Command Number: 59


Description

Sets the event address for turning the laser off. Address range is 0-7 where address 0 is no event. </div>

ice/commands/peaklock.txt · Last modified: 2018/11/26 17:33 by Michael Radunsky